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Georges Jewfish Situation -v- Hawkesbury Jewfish Situation Atm...


jewgaffer

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Hi Everyone

I have some time at the moment, recovering at home after having hand surgery on Thursday, so I decided to do a new topic, comparing the recent good school jewfish results in the Georges with the equivalent school jewfish results in the Hawkesbury.....I have managed to get reliable feed back on the current situation in both rivers from equally reliable sources........

First of all, soapy size jewfish also school up, whereas school jewfish are jewfish around 6-8 kilos, though it's not uncommon to find jewfish around 4 and 5 kilos in with a breeding school.... In other words, school jewfish are regarded as being from four kilos if mature enough and up to 12 kilos before they are regarded as and often referred to as Mulloway........

Going on the good Georges school jewfish results over ther last month or so and the number of undersize soapy jewfish still being caught all over the Hawkesbury, makes it quite interesting as we are now into Autumn and both rivers lost most of their fish to migration due to the unusally cold conditions thru Autumn and Winter last year, when instead of getting a few warm days on end, we got weeks of rain and flooding and lousy conditions instead of getting Autumn and normal winter relief, and all of this happened right on optimum breeding time.....

Georges River Jewfish Situation V Hawkesbury River Jewfish Situation At The Moment

Over Time, Georges River jewfish, with a couple of extra bridges added here and there and the extra holes and structure added by building same, and Hawkesbury River jewfish have become resident to both rivers, however the Georges system has resident jewfish to a far lesser extent in comparison with the Hawkesbury system......

The fact that the Georges has no way near the length and the spread of the Hawkesbury and its tributaries and bays, is not the main reason for my saying this, as along our coastline good jewfish often come in small inlets, not as many in general by comparison, but the smaller the suitable inlet, the more jewfish where you are fishing......

However in comparing the two, the Hawkesbury system, being at the bottom of a series of panoramic mountains, and having an almost endless series of deep valleys and mountains and the many bluffs - such as the bluffs at the side of the mouth at Cowan [Tip :thumbup: ] - with good water, good points, good depth and good structure at the bases.......

Add to that the Hawkesbury's open areas with deep sea like depths, it's structure and conditions particularly in the lower parts of it, which makes for easy and more practical entry for marauding jewfish coming in from outside, in or out of breeding season, generally as high tide run out tide feeders [Tip :thumbup:]....

Meaning top of the tide/run out tide hunters and fossickers by habit......These are the same Wanda, Narrabeen jew and are habitual high tide stillwater/ run out tide feeders repetitively hunting along the nearby beach fronts and frequently swimming in with the tide to seek food along the sand and round up baitfish etc that are around their main port of call which is generally the closest downriver structure of an estuary.....

For example CC Bridge, being the first George's proper structure for jewfish coming over the Bay and naturally coming in via the deep water side, and that is the red marker side off the Towra side, to hunt food out into the open at the closest part of CC Bridge........ Thus pylons 1-4 are a natural for jewfish hunting that side first...... [tip :thumbup:]

Let's call these marauding high tide jew - the flip side is the number of resident up river jew that are regularly caught from the bottom of the tide up.... When you see that the conditions are good, the best way is to fish Baldface/Tom Uglys Bridge over two tides and get them both ways and together! i.e. residents and incoming jew :thumbup:

Jewfish coming in in schools of males escorting females into temperate areas to suit the female cycle and going upriver if the mouth areas are not suitable and at times regardless of mouth area suitability and going in and congregating, holing up [Tip :thumbup:] wherever is best according to season.....Not that you can't stir a few up in the holes, you'll find that when they come out, these jewfish are in optimum feeding mode...........

Back to the Hawkewsbury... Around the low and lowest parts of the bases there are individual underwater rocks and a plethora of rocky outcrops making the Hawesbury in that respect a haven for jewfish packs hunting for food along the sand [tip :thumbup: ] so as to have room to move away from or hunt at the sides of the outcrops according to the direction of the tide.....

The Hawkesbury has, among other attributes condusive to the ongoing well being of jewfish, deep sea like depths, more structure and reef than the Georges, and provides more attractive offshoots and lea areas and, being one massive wind tunnel to a good extent in the lower and middle parts of it, is also subject to rougher water conditions more often ......

The Hawkesbury has unusually deep rocky areas almost throughout its offshoots and bays as well as having unusually deep sandy areas and uneven contours due to the nature of the river, the nature of it's source of tidal exchanges at both ends and its powerful influence on the movement of water.........

In the case of the Hawkesbury, the Hawkesbury system has been populated and occupied for thousands of years by jewfish masses. Occupied meaning staying long enough to become residents and residents meaning staying in the system for a much longer period than high tide come and go jew at other times apart from the massive feeding habits before, during and after breeding times moreso for the females ....... .... jewfish masses meaning schools of all sizes including Mulloway escorting their ilk ..... Mulloway join other jewfish included school size jewfish escorting both school size and mulloway females..... Mulloway travel and hunt in packs more often than not....a big Mulloway is a very big fish indeed......

Whereas the Georges has been gradually populated by coming and going jewfish moreso than having the suitabilty to accomodate large numbers of jewfish residents of all sizes over a given period compared to the Hawkesbury......

The Georges system, because of not having such multi area compatabilty as the Hawkesbury system, has far less numbers of jewfish fry...... Accordingly Georges river jewfish fry have a far less survival rate, thus there are far less undersize jewfish caught regularly in the Georges...........

Thus Pete Tide'N'Knots throws back more undersize jew in one little part of Wiseman's alone and quite regularly and the numbers Pete has caught around one small bluff in that one little area adds up to more than you can count.

.....In regard to to far less numbers of jewfish fry in my previous paragraph, and, accordingly and for that very reason, brings in this fact .....The Georges, having a lack of depth to safely accomodate let's say jewfish nursuries around mangrove areas etc, in comparison to the Hawkesbury, it's resident undersize soapies and fry and the number of Mulloway escorts in attendence, the survival rate of jewfish fry is far less in the Georges and also rivers similiar to the Georges.....

.....Incoming fish have to be considered, on one hand top of the tide fish feeding and going back out, or breeeding size school jewfish or mulloway females escorted upriver by school size jewfish also escorting either size females and intermingling for both safety purposes and selective breeding purpose

When there are thousands of undersize jewfish around, which in reality is the case on all accounts in the massive Hawkesbury system at the moment, the expectations of larger fish being caught over a period of several months are quite justified, as jewfish are known to have a fast growth rate......

However when comparing the number of jewfish in each one of these rivers, over say any prime time period, the Hawkebury jewfish would outnumber the Georges not by 50 to one but more like 1000 to one when you look at the size of these two systems and compare the suitabilty of each one for longer term jewfish congregational periods

Like most other rivers the Hawkesbury which in reality is regarded as the home of the jew not only as far as our area, Sydney is concerned... For that matter, the Hawkesbury River could also be justifiably regarded and particularly by travelling jewfishermen as being the home of the jew on the East coast of Australia.

The fingerling program where they released approximately 100,000 into the Georges has increased numbers of young jewfish in the Georges to a good extent I would say, however thousands would not have survived predators such as bream and flathead, just to mention a few, as the fingerlings made their way up river to grow........

Nature would have it that young jewfish would seek out larger escorts of their ilk and the larger escorts would in turn seek them out to escort them, and a Mulloway pack would watch over the soapies, stay around the soapies upriver [Tip :thumbup:] to virtually guard them until they grow to a large enough size to go outside and fend for themselves..... and so the jewfish cycle goes on and so on.... The upper Hawkesbury will always have more Molloway than the upper Georges to look after and protect their own

Cheers

jewgaffer :1fishing1:

Edited by jewgaffer
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