Jump to content

Who uses Bread in their burley and as bait


Pickles

Recommended Posts

I always burley when fishing, except when over deep water off shore.
I usually always use bread mixed with Yakkas (from the last trip) as the burley. I put these in my burley pot (attached to back of the boat) and pound up with a muncher. I’ve noticed kingfish, bream and snapper come up and take the burley right at the back of the boat like the Yakkas and have caught some really good fish on bread (as well as yakka strips). Thought I’d share this with new Raiders - it will be a non brainer for more seasoned fishos.

For me - “No burley, No fish”

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use bread for bait and burley in shallow water for Bream and Mullet, when Snapper fishing I prefer bits of what I am using for bait as burley, don't use the "pot" when Snapper fishing, just bits of bait sized offcuts over the side now and then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have been using bread as bait a lot recently. I find I almost always find quality bream if they are around, even though I've been mostly been going for mullet and gars (need to let the bait sink a little deeper though...maybe 1m+).

Not sure if anyone knows of 'punched' bread, that the coarse fishermen use in the UK. It's actually a great way of presenting a very neat and tiny bread bait for smaller fish like yakkas, poddies and gars. Simply nuke a couple of pieces of cheap white bread in the microwave for 30 seconds, roll them flat together with a rolling pin and use a piece of tubing (I use an old biro with the insert removed) to 'punch' out little circles of bread about 3-5mm in diameter.

That way two slices of bread makes enough baits to fish for half an hour or so...enough to collect some baits or a feed of gars.

You can actually buy proper bread punches from the UK, but to be honest you can probably find something from around the house to fashion one out of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use fresh bread, take the middle out and squash it on/around the hook, because it's squashed on, it has no air and will sink and cast a decent distance with no sinker, burley is always soaked in water so it doesn't float and attract Seagulls.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...