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Chasing Bream/Flathead around Kissing Point Sydney


lhan

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Hi all,

This is my very first fishing report here so please kindly advice anything wrong or things I could improve.

I've been exclusively lure fishing around Kissing Point Park for the past two weeks targeting bream and flathead. The gear I used is either a ML 3-5kg rod paired with a 2500 reel spooled with 10lb braid or a UL 1-3kg rod paired with a 2000 reel spooled with 6lb braid, leader is 8/10lb fluro depending on the lure weight I'm gonna throw - SP or micro jigs. The time I fish really varies - just whenever I can - usually a short lunch session or afterwork! But generally I tried to fish around the middle of a run-in/run-out, when the tide is moving and water is not to shallow for the fish to come by.

The location has produced well for me, in total less than 5hrs of fishing I've landed about 10 fish. It's pretty good for a beginner like me! Flathead is almost a guarantee catch as they're pretty predictable - there's a dropoff on the left hand side, cast there when it's running out, surely you will be able to feel a lovely headshake after a few casts. Bream is more of a hit and miss for me as I can't really crack the code catching them. Maybe it's because I'm fishing an open area instead of structure? Maybe I'm still not experienced enough to detect their fussy bites? The two I hooked up all gave a pretty solid bite and run - great fun I really would like more!

Some thoughts along my short lure journey after a few trial and error, hopefully this would help someone new to lure fishing like myself:

1. start light - light gear + light line (~6lbs) gives a lot more covering distance. If you can't crack the code catching fish, brute force it. Lightness is the brute force algorithm here. I started by getting a 3-5kg rod + 15lbs braid which isn't really necessary. I do playing a lot of micro jigging (7-14g, I found out "micro" can be really different everywhere when jigging) which comes in handy for me lately but for the usual SP&small hardbody around estuary, I now really prefer my UL setup.

2. be mobile. The same as 1 actually, brute force to find the fish

3. put trust in your lure. Lure fishing takes more time to take off, be patient and asking for help. People on this forum is more than helpful. @DerekD & @Little_Flatty really helped me a lot and are happily taking all my bragging about my small catches lol

Tight lines and enjoy,

Henry

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Edited by lhan
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My take on Bream compared to Flathead….. Bream tend to be more productive when fishing right in on snags, fallen trees, jetties, rocks and so on, and tiny lures seem to be the best.  Very early morning and late afternoon triple your chances of a decent catch (in my opinion) stealth is your friend, big Bream can be right up in shallow water when they feel “safe” casting well ahead into likely spots before you go stomping around will often yield a trophy Bream. A well presented lure combined with an accurate cast will often get a hit the second it hits the water.

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30 minutes ago, noelm said:

My take on Bream compared to Flathead….. Bream tend to be more productive when fishing right in on snags, fallen trees, jetties, rocks and so on, and tiny lures seem to be the best.  Very early morning and late afternoon triple your chances of a decent catch (in my opinion) stealth is your friend, big Bream can be right up in shallow water when they feel “safe” casting well ahead into likely spots before you go stomping around will often yield a trophy Bream. A well presented lure combined with an accurate cast will often get a hit the second it hits the water.

totally agree @noelm. The two I caught were pretty close to the shoreline, I believe the water was also a bit muddy as well so they could be a bit blinded.If I have the chance, I'll try some better time windows too!

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It seems to me that you have researched your fish species well and know what you are doing, as evidenced by your pictures. Always remember that the session where you catch nothing is a session to learn from, BUT there is never a guarantee that the fish will be biting all the time.

Good luck with your fishing and keep taking those quality pictures.

bn

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12 minutes ago, Aussie_fisher said:

Great report and pics. Tried there a few times but the current always screwed me up. How do you avoid the current?

The trick is to work with it rather than against it.

Cast up-current and retrieve your lure with it. Line management is important (retrieving enough line to keep the line straight, as the current brings your line/lure towards you), as is selecting an appropriate weight lure (to make sure it reaches your desired zone before your lure gets too close to you).

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21 hours ago, Aussie_fisher said:

Great report and pics. Tried there a few times but the current always screwed me up. How do you avoid the current?

@Aussie_fisher Pretty much as @Little_Flatty said - keep your slack minimum and choose the correct weight. The sweet spot is you can feel the tension of your line but not dragging the lure. I was using 1/12 - 1/8 which sink reasonably fast as the water is not too deep there. If it's high tide and you're targeting mixed bag, I think 1/6 will do for bottom searching flathead.

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On 2/1/2024 at 3:07 PM, lhan said:

Hi all,

This is my very first fishing report here so please kindly advice anything wrong or things I could improve.

I've been exclusively lure fishing around Kissing Point Park for the past two weeks targeting bream and flathead. The gear I used is either a ML 3-5kg rod paired with a 2500 reel spooled with 10lb braid or a UL 1-3kg rod paired with a 2000 reel spooled with 6lb braid, leader is 8/10lb fluro depending on the lure weight I'm gonna throw - SP or micro jigs. The time I fish really varies - just whenever I can - usually a short lunch session or afterwork! But generally I tried to fish around the middle of a run-in/run-out, when the tide is moving and water is not to shallow for the fish to come by.

The location has produced well for me, in total less than 5hrs of fishing I've landed about 10 fish. It's pretty good for a beginner like me! Flathead is almost a guarantee catch as they're pretty predictable - there's a dropoff on the left hand side, cast there when it's running out, surely you will be able to feel a lovely headshake after a few casts. Bream is more of a hit and miss for me as I can't really crack the code catching them. Maybe it's because I'm fishing an open area instead of structure? Maybe I'm still not experienced enough to detect their fussy bites? The two I hooked up all gave a pretty solid bite and run - great fun I really would like more!

Some thoughts along my short lure journey after a few trial and error, hopefully this would help someone new to lure fishing like myself:

1. start light - light gear + light line (~6lbs) gives a lot more covering distance. If you can't crack the code catching fish, brute force it. Lightness is the brute force algorithm here. I started by getting a 3-5kg rod + 15lbs braid which isn't really necessary. I do playing a lot of micro jigging (7-14g, I found out "micro" can be really different everywhere when jigging) which comes in handy for me lately but for the usual SP&small hardbody around estuary, I now really prefer my UL setup.

2. be mobile. The same as 1 actually, brute force to find the fish

3. put trust in your lure. Lure fishing takes more time to take off, be patient and asking for help. People on this forum is more than helpful. @DerekD & @Little_Flatty really helped me a lot and are happily taking all my bragging about my small catches lol

Tight lines and enjoy,

Henry

image.thumb.jpeg.b23d73b936001945f1fdf7f721760eb5.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.5476d29665a6f3e693350b00c3352655.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.83c971cbb747a25784fe70221796fdd1.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.28048ae813f804563d26b728efcdff85.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.3ac9f800af5f757590df0b81385137e2.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.0f2781274cea82ce1360cbe8517951d4.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.b58cdcc7c4ee3a77d6094b25f107ecd3.jpeg

5826e1e9-05b0-48e7-8a91-e0ccb177b932.jpeg

msg284078038-249958.jpg

I am guessing this was close to run out tide. Honestly that plavmce never really produced anything for me granted that it was winter when last fished there

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3 hours ago, faker said:

I am guessing this was close to run out tide. Honestly that plavmce never really produced anything for me granted that it was winter when last fished there

yes I tried to align my session with solunar time when fish 'should' be more active which mostly is the second half of running out tide. But people generally think it's better to fish one hour before and after the high tide.

From my limited experience and restricted fishing time, solunar + tide can be both effective but with different boost factors depending on location - I know a spot in middle harbour that produces very well for me only when high tide but one spot I had more success on low tide. So sometimes it's good to fish some random hours at the same spot - just getting to know it better.

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Fish don’t have fancy charts and tables, they eat to survive, certain species might feed better with a falling tide, lurking along a drop off, waiting for small bait fish and shrimp to leave as the water drops (Flathead) other fish might sneak right up in the very shallow water at high tide, looking for small Crabs and Worms (Bream/Whiting) others might feed along the edge of weed beds as the tide rises or falls depending on the food available. Fish when you can, and in locations that suit your intended species, adjust your tactics to suit the conditions.

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