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WD-40


tw9635

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In the past I have just simply sprayed WD-40 on my reels after cleaning them. However I've read that this can be very bad for reels and prolonge their "life". Is this true and if so what are some better ways to keep ur reel smooth?

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WD-40 and those types of sprays can get into the reel through joints and tiny gaps. It will then thin and wash out valuable grease and oils which are lubricating it and keeping it running smooth. Spraying WD40 wont do anything to keep your reel running smooth if that is what you are asking. It will do the opposite.

The best ways to keep your reels smooth is to not get too much water on them as this can get inside much the same way as WD40. and to service them when they show signs of becoming less smooth.

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  • 8 months later...

Always done the warm water treatment, just wiping them down to remove salt. A mate/ a few others have said they use Inox, or a non solvent style spray to keep the salt/water from "sticking". Not sure if I'm keen to give it a go..maybe on one of my Siennas so as not to break the bank

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

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  • 2 years later...

Vaseline for my reel insides where needed and WD-40.

I have had an Alvey reel for almost 30+ years,always used vaso and or WD-40,never had a problem and the insides are still in original condition.

WD-40 for my lures,after use.

Edited by D.G
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I think Inox is in the same category as WD40. The website actually warns you that it will attack natural rubbers so it sounds like it's petroleum based. It is well established that petroleum products will attack natural rubber as well as some synthetic ones too. They will also dissolve oils and greases. I spray my reels will silicone spay (after rinsing with fresh water) which is much more neutral and will not harm rubber. It helps keep corrosion down on the exposed metal surfaces. 

Edited by kingfishbig
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Guest Guest123456789

If you want to break your reel, use WD40.

Inox is not petroleum based, it's lanolin based. Where contact with rubber might occur, use Lanox instead of Inox as Lanox doesn't affect rubber. 

Inox and Lanox will liquefy grease so top it back up where needed. Don't use two different types of grease where possible.

When lubricants are used correctly, even the crappy department store reels will last a long time. My el cheapo beach reel is 5 years old and I've dropped it in the sand and sea many times.

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Actually they don't reveal what is in Inox they just state 'ingredients determined not to be hazardous'. The fact that they warn it may harm natural rubber tends to suggest that it is petroleum based. 

Lanox on the other hand is described as being based on lanolin or sheep grease but they don't give a formulation either.

I'm not sure how Lanox would go sprayed on to a reel. Wouldn't it be a bit sticky and spoil the appearance due to discolouration?

 

 

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8 hours ago, flatheadluke said:

Only one way to find out for sure

I have used Lanox on my boat trailer and it's good for that. But it gives it a brown colour and is a magnet for dirt and dust so I don't think it would be ideal for a fishing reel. I like silicon spray because it leaves a clear, non sticky film and is safe around rubber parts as already mentioned. 

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I don't use any of the above products on my reels, just rinse off the rod and reel gently after use and sun dry. Every 6 months I wash the entire rod and wipe the spool in a light sugar soap solution (and then wipe the reel off with clean water to remove any sugar soap) and service the reels - how much I do depends on the use they have taken in the 6 months. Minimum is a quick disassemble, clean and drop of oil on the roller bearing and handles. Those that copped more use are opened up and have food grade grease applied to the gears. Currently I use Daiwa oil and Inox grease.

I use silicone spray on the zips of my Bimini, Armorall on the Bimini surface and seats and Vaseline on all press studs. Sugar soap to wash all surfaces beforehand. I also spray Lanox liberally inside the outboard to displace any stray salt water, deliberately use Lanox to avoid any issues with fuel hoses.

So far so good but would love to hear any Raider feedback.

Edited by brad_tate
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  • 2 months later...
Guest Guest123456789
22 hours ago, DMG said:

yer i always wash gear that has been in salt water,with the garden hose,salt water will rot ya stuff.

This guys doesn't seem to think so

 

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I have been using Inox for years,  I used it on my Yabby Pump, The washers swelled up and I nearly had a Heart Attack pumping half a dozen Yabbies !!!!!!!  Replaced them and they were almost half the size again of the originals!!!  Howard.

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Hi Fellas;

I have used the old system to clean reels for many years.

Screw  down the drags and take them under the shower with you.

Unscrew the drags and put them in the sun to dry.

Then oil the usual places with a good lubricant. ( I use Inox.)

Then wipe the reel with a bit of paper towel and the job is done.

A good tip for yabbie pumps.

DO NOT put any grease on them at all.

Grease and sand is a fantastic abrasive and will wear out anything..

Just give the pump a thorough hose out and leave it.

Above systems have worked for me for many years.

Cheers.

Oldfella.

 

 

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  • 3 years later...
On 3/18/2017 at 5:17 PM, Oldfella said:

A good tip for yabbie pumps.

DO NOT put any grease on them at all.

Grease and sand is a fantastic abrasive and will wear out anything..

Just give the pump a thorough hose out and leave it.

I also back off the wing nut squeezing the rubber washer / seal that way it allows it to stay its normal thickness rather than squashing down over time.

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  • 11 months later...

I tighten the drag and rinse off using the last bit of the salt away I use to flush my motor with and give the rod grips a scrub with some dishwashing detergent then a light spray with tap water as,I found the salt away can leave a white residue on the rod - it seems harmless but I don’t like it  . I leave mine in the shade to dry then back the drags right off , i then put a few drops or reel oil ( usually the Daiwa stuff as it is easy for me to get ) on the bail pivots , handle and line roller and give it a spin to flick off any excess . Once that is done wipe it down with some paper towel with some Mako oil on it and put it away . I have tested Mako against Lanotec by cutting up a few discs of mild steel bar (40mm diameter ) degreasing in acetone and applying a very thin coat of each product to each disc - one was left untreated , these were left outside on the awning hand rail where they copped the full brunt of the elements for a month - The Mako only had two small spots of rust less than 10 % coverage , the Lanotec had multiple small spots around 40% coverage and the untreated one was covered in a nice furry coating of orange cancer- 100% coverage  . Steve Starling put me onto this product a couple of years back and I have found it to be the best stuff I have used on my gear - it does have a very slight fish smell but nothing overpowering , I’m seriously considering spraying some on a soft plastic to see if it makes any difference to my catch ratio 🤣

Grease - this one can be tricky because if you use too thick a grease you will notice it as the reel will be a lot stiffer to turn , I generally try to stick with the same brand of grease as the reel make . If I stick Penn grease in my Daiwa it bogs it down - Alvey grease is even worse as it is made for sidecast reels where you want maximum washout resistance -just don’t use Automotive grease- it doesn’t have the water resistant qualities of a good quality silicone based reel grease , is too heavy and doesn’t contain the same anti corrosion additives .

I know some of the tournament guys will only use the same grease that was used in manufacturing to keep the reel feeling the same as it did when new - I suppose that if you’re sponsored you can ask for such luxuries 🤑

WD40 is essentially kerosene and a very light oil - not something I would recommend putting on any of your gear . I use it as a cutting fluid when drilling or machining Aluminium and it excels at this and only this .

Edited by XD351
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